Thursday, June 02, 2016

Start a Perennial Garden During Perennial Gardening Month With Tips From Costa Farms

Perennials are a great investment and the foundation of an attractive, long-lasting landscape. Year after year, these plants come back adding bold color and texture to the yard. Celebrate Perennial Gardening Month this June by planting these beauties in the heart of your garden.
With this in mind, Costa Farms’ has introduced a new free email course on perennial gardening hosted by gardening guru Justin Hancock.
In just four emails, Costa Farms’ gives gardeners the knowledge they need to become perennial gardening pros — from planning and designing tips to information on selecting long-living plants and caring for them.
Their free "Grow a Perfect Perennial Garden" eCourse is easy to navigate and filled with expert advice to help gardeners create perennial gardens that fit their lifestyle and needs.
Get started with these four simple tips from the new eCourse’s lesson on “How to Select the Perfect Perennials for Your Yard."

1. The Right Light. An area is considered full sun if it gets at least 6 to 8 hours of direct sunlight a day throughout most of the gardening season. It’s considered part sun (or part shade) if it gets between 3 and 6 hours of direct sun per day, particularly in the afternoon. And it’s usually considered shade if it sees less than 3 hours of direct sun.
2. Know Your Soil. Your garden’s soil type plays an important role for certain types of perennials.
3. Climate Matters. Most common perennials will thrive throughout most of North America during the summer, but there are a few varieties that sulk in hot, humid summers.
4. Pick Plant Qualities that Are Important. After mapping out the yard’s growing conditions comes the fun part: Mapping out the attributes you like. Start by making a list of what’s most important.
To sign up for Costa Farms’ perennial email course, visit CostaFarms.com. Happy Gardening! 

1 comment:

michael said...

It is very easy to grow potatoes since you can plant them in almost any kind of land. Just remember to protect them from against the frost by piling up the soil around the crop.