Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Happy Summer Solstice

Hello summer and the longest day of the year! I still can't believe that summer is finally upon us. Now it's time to sit back and enjoy my garden. I'm all about low-maintenance gardening, so I thought I would share some of my favorite plants that are blooming right now in my city garden.

First up, the ever-blooming Endless Summer mophead hydrangea. I've had this one for at least three years now and it's quite spectacular in full bloom! I love the fact that I if I cut off the blue blooms, this encourages the plant to grow more. Plus these blooms look amazing as cut flowers in vases.


Next up, coreopsis 'Sunshine Superman' from Northcreek Nurseries. I was luckily enough to pick this up last year at the GWA Symposium in Dallas. What a beauty this turned out to be! It's golden yellow flowers, which are low-spreading, will bloom now until October. It's an easy native that can survive in sun or part shade. I think it looks right at home with my Sapphire Indigo (TM) clematis.

And finally, the extraordinary lacecap hydrangea called 'Veitchii,' which is just starting to bloom now. During the summer it will produce these showy lacecap clusters of flowers that range from pink to blue to white depending on your soil PH. Mine grows happily in full sun, but it also does well in partial shade.

I'd love to hear which plants are blooming in your garden!


-Stacey

2 comments:

Hazel Audrin said...

As a member of the affordable ghostwriters team, I will let people know that The summer solstice is a time of nature and abundance. The element is FIRE, the direction is south and all around us we are surrounded by colour and fragrant aroma from flowering roses, wallflowers, lavender, honeysuckle and jasmine.

sarahali said...

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